BUYERS GUIDE

 

 

 

 

RUGBY BOOT

WORLD RUGBY SHOP'S DEFINITIVE GUIDE TO HELP YOU FIND YOUR PERFECT BOOT

BOOT TYPES

MATERIALS

BUDGET

ANATOMY OF A BOOT

FIT

 

THINGS TO CONSIDER

 

When you're in the market for a new Rugby boot there is a lot of information to sort through. It can be overwhelming and difficult to understand what you need and what you don’t.  We're going to organize all the information you need to know to make an informed decision on your next Rugby boot purchase.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOP4

 

 

 

 

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START HERE

 

 

Purchasing the boot type is a key decision depending on field conditions and your position.

Here's your guide to:

 

 

 

 

BOOT TYPES

 

 

 

 

SOFT GROUND

FIRM GROUND

ARTIFICIAL GRASS

HARD GROUND/TURF

SOFT GROUND

 

 

 

 

FIRM GROUND

 

 

 

 

 



ARTIFICIAL GRASS

 

 

 


HARD GROUND/TURF

 

 

 

 


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FIT & SIZING

 

 

 

 

RUGBY BOOT

 

THINGS TO CONSIDER

 

For rugby boots, the aim is for a snug fit.

Rugby boots should fit as close to the end of the foot as possible without touching the toes for performance and comfort.

A 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch gap is ideal.

 

Women’s sizing is smaller by a size to a size-and-a-half. For example, if you wear a women’s size 8, you would wear a men’s 6.5. Youth or junior sizes are simply smaller men’s sizes (sizes 1-6).

 

Also be sure to pay attention to which country or regions standard the boot is sized in.

At World Rugby Shop we list American sizes but have conversion charts for reference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

WRS SIZING CHART

MATERIALS

 

 

 

 

 

THINGS TO CONSIDER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KANGAROO LEATHER

CALF SKIN LEATHER

FULL GRAIN LEATHER

SYNTHETICS

BUDGET

 

 

 

 

RUGBY BOOT

 

THINGS TO CONSIDER

 

It's a good idea to own 2 pairs of boots: 1 firm ground pair and 1 soft ground pair appropriate to your position.  This is the ideal scenario and may not be feasible for everyone. Having the 2 pairs will cover you for most any field type or weather you are going to encounter.  The more competitive your team, the more this matters as even small performance drops can make a big difference in how you perform.  So if your budget allows, opt for two pairs, with a less expensive pair as a backup option for inclement weather or the odd travel game.

 

In the event you can only purchase one pair of boots, it is best to own a longer studded firm ground (FG) pair.  This will cover the greatest array of fields you are likely going to encounter.  The one caveat to this is if you live in an area that gets lots of consistent moisture during the season such that the fields are always soft enough for soft ground (SG) boots or you play in a position that requires tons of traction and the fields can handle SG cleats.

 

Another factor associated with the budget is the quality of the boot.  There is a wide array of price points to choose from, but the most expensive boots are higher quality.  There is a connection between the cost of the boot and its comfort, performance and durability.

 

 

 

 

 

ANATOMY

 

 

 

 

RUGBY BOOT

INSOLE OR SOCK LINER

This is the cushioning inside the shoe that is designed to offer cushioning, disperse stud pressure and protect the foot from excessive slippage and skin irritation. These are often removable so specialized orthotics can be inserted, but some boots have fixed insoles. If you want to replace them or use orthotics, make sure the insole is removable.
MIDSOLE

The cushioning built into the shoe. Sits between the insole and the outsole or foot plate and cannot be removed.
OUTSOLE

The outsole is the bottom of the rugby boot. This is where the studs reside and are the part of the boot that determines whether one is made for soft ground, firm ground, etc.
UPPER

The upper is basically all the material above the bottom of the boot or outsole (see below). It is what wraps around your foot.
STUDS/CLEATS

These are the blades, cones or studs fixed to the bottom of the outsole. They can be a range of types and patterns depending on the field conditions they are designed for.
VAMP

Front portion of the upper, aka the strike zone. The part of the upper that makes contact with the ball. Many vamps are stitched or have added technologies to enhance kicking power, ball control or comfort.
HEEL COUNTER

The back portion of the shoe that cradles the heel of the foot. This is designed to provide stability to the foot when changing direction particularly laterally. Typically, the higher and more rigid the heel counter the more control and support it offers. This lets it withstand significant side to side shifts while providing maximum stability. Proper cushioning needs to be employed to avoid blistering.

 

BOOT ANATOMY TERMS

 

UPPER

The upper is basically all the material above the bottom of the boot or outsole (see below).  It is what wraps around your foot.

 

 

OUTSOLE

The outsole is the bottom of the rugby boot.  This is where the studs reside and are the part of the boot that determines whether one is made for soft ground, firm ground, etc.

 

 

INSOLE/SOCKLINER

This is the cushioning inside the shoe that is designed to offer cushioning, disperse stud pressure and protect the foot from excessive slippage and skin irritation.  These are often removable so specialized orthotics can be inserted, but some boots have fixed insoles.  If you want to replace them or use orthotics, make sure the insole is removable.

 

 

MIDSOLE

The cushioning built into the shoe.  Sits between the insole and the outsole or foot plate and cannot be removed.

 

HEEL COUNTER OR EXTERNAL HEEL COUNTER

The back portion of the shoe that cradles the heel of the foot. This is designed to provide stability to the foot when changing direction particularly laterally.  Typically, the higher and more rigid the heel counter the more control and support it offers.  This lets it withstand significant side to side shifts while providing maximum stability.  Proper cushioning needs to be employed to avoid blistering.

 

 

VAMP

Front portion of the upper, aka the strike zone. The part of the upper that makes contact with the ball. Many vamps are stitched or have added technologies to enhance kicking power, ball control or comfort.

 

STUDS/CLEATS

These are the blades, cones or studs fixed to the bottom of the outsole.  They can be a range of types and patterns depending on the field conditions they are designed for.

 

 

LAST

Lasts are the three dimensional forms that rugby boots are constructed on. This is what determines the size and shape of the rugby boot.  Terms like “wide last” or “narrow last” refer to whether the boots are designed for wide or narrow feet.

 

 

RUGBY BOOTS vs OTHER BOOTS

It is very common now to see players at all levels wearing both rugby and soccer boots. The demands of some positions, particularly in the backs, do not require a rugby specific boot.  However, certain positions benefit massively from a rugby specific boot.  The tight five in particular require 8 studs for soft grounds and the ability to handle tremendous amounts of pushing in scrums, rucks and mauls.  Non-Rugby specific boots are not designed with these requirements in mind.

In general pack players will benefit more from Rugby specific boots than backs.  On firm ground, hard ground and artificial grass all players can wear molded boots so rugby specific boots become less significant although rugby specific lines do have some tweaks more focused on the particularly kicking needs and running styles of rugby compared to other sports.

 

 

 

 

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BUDGET

 

 

 

 

RUGBY BOOT

RUGBY BOOT